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Where Can I Buy Organic Gatorade


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Bloom says health is definitely a driver in the purchase of organic products: "We're seeing that about half of consumers who purchase organic products do so because they think they're healthier than non-organic products."


Take, for instance, the sugar content. Even though Gatorade seems to have switched to an organic cane sugar for its new organic line, Choi says that, nutritionally, this makes little difference. (We asked Gatorade to confirm the ingredient list of the new organic line, but did not hear back in time for press.)


For instance, women are told to limit consumption to somewhere between 25 and 37 grams of sugar per day, total. "So, drinking a bottle of [sports drink] is already getting you close to what you should get in one day," Choi says.


Lots of dieticians agree. "Sugar is sugar, so no matter if it's organic or not, it's still going to have the same effect on your body," says Lisa Cimperman, a clinical dietician and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.


Cimperman says the new organic label may lead consumers to think organic Gatorade is healthier for them. "I think it's a marketing ploy to apply this organic health halo to this product," Cimperman says.


And that halo will likely cost you more. Bloomberg reports that G Organic will cost about an extra 50 cents per 16.9 ounce bottle, compared to the non-organic options of the same size, such as Gatorade Thirst Quencher.


PepsiCo is introducing a version of Gatorade that's certified organic by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, testing whether a product created in a lab with artificial flavors and colors can adapt to America's growing natural-food movement.


After two years of research, the company is now selling strawberry, lemon and mixed berry G Organic in some Kroger supermarkets, said Brett O'Brien, Gatorade's senior VP and general manager. It plans to expand the rollout to select grocery, natural and convenience stores over the next few weeks. The suggested retail price for the new drinks is $1.69 for a 16.9-ounce bottle, 50 cents more than for Gatorade Thirst Quencher, the nonorganic equivalent.


"We heard pretty loud through the locker rooms, through our work with nutritionists, that there is an interest and a desire among athletes to go organic," Mr. O'Brien said in an interview. "Somewhere around 10 to 12% of athletes are saying they're interested in purchasing organic products."


To be considered organic, the new Gatorade had to shed artificial ingredients and PepsiCo needed to refine its manufacturing. Every step of the process was approved by the USDA, which aims to ensure organic products are more natural and less harmful to the environment.


Kraft Heinz released an organic version of Capri Sun juice last year and took artificial colors and flavors out of its macaroni and cheese. General Mills has removed artificial ingredients from some cereals. Campbell Soup has pledged to make all of its North American products without artificial colors or flavors by the end of fiscal 2018. Panera removed artificial ingredients from its kids menu.


"There's that misnomer that if it's organic it can't taste good, and that's not the case," he said. "We're just trying to get people familiar with the product, what it means, what it does and try it. Once we've checked those boxes, we've got a big opportunity here."


But in lock-step with the current trend of pressed juices, soda bans, and more carbonated water, PepsiCo will introduce an organic flavor of Gatorade into the market in 2016, according to Business Insider.


Dec 7, 2014; Denver, CO, USA; General view of the gatorade refreshment area for the Denver Broncos before the game against the Buffalo Bills at Sports Authority Field at Mile High. Mandatory Credit: Ron Chenoy-USA TODAY Sports


PepsiCo recently revealed plans to make an organic Gatorade in 2016. Yes, you read that right. As the soda market dwindles and consumers increasingly seek out beverage products with good-for-you ingredients and other health-related attributes, PepsiCo executives are hoping to capitalize on a market trend of non-GMO product sales reaching $800 billion by 2017.


PepsiCo has yet to reveal which ingredients in the sports drink will be reformulated and swapped for organic alternatives. Gatorade, estimated to command 77 percent of the U.S. sports drink market, already includes a variety of natural ingredients and flavors, Fortune reported.


Based on public perception and consumer interest alone, the question we beg to ask is: Is the reformulation of the often celebrity-endorsed, sugary, neon sports drink enough to sway consumer consumption If you recall, Nabisco attempted a similar stunt in 2007 introducing organic Oreos that ultimately failed in the marketplace. When junk food goes 'organic' -- an adopted term that is shamelessly void of any legally-binding definition in consumer products -- brand perception and public health trends trump fancy marketing campaigns.


Here is where I insert the disclaimer that I am not a doctor! If you are watching your sodium intake for any reason, you should consult your physician before consuming a drink containing extra salt. I am not here to tell you when a sports drink is appropriate for you or how much to drink. I am simply here to share a natural recipe that I am comfortable serving my family when I feel like replacing electrolytes is important based on extreme exertion or illness. Basically, if you already buy and consume Gatorade or a comparable sports drink, this version serves the same purpose while being healthier.


Cane sugar IS natural. There's demerara sugar/sugar in the raw that is less refined, and you can also get organic sugar. But cane sugar is a natural sweetener. Honey and agave have more calories, and agave has more fructose which is more difficult for the liver to process. Sugar no matter the source isn't that good for you. But cane sugar shouldn't be vilified either.


Fortune has reached out to PepsiCo to ask what Gatorade ingredients will be organic and will update this post if and when we hear back. Gatorade, which by some estimates commands 77% of the U.S. sports drink market, includes some natural ingredients and flavors.


At the conference, Carey said, "It's a consumer interest. I think they're very interested in non-GMO and organic, and to the degree you can make it meaningful to the consumer." While Carey didn't reveal any further details about the proposed organic sports drink, it could be part of a larger, company-wide initiative. For example, PepsiCo will also be rolling out Tropicana juices with specific non-GMO labels in 2016.


After two years of research, the company is now selling strawberry, lemon and mixed berry G Organic in some Kroger Co. supermarkets, said Brett O'Brien, Chicago-based Gatorade's senior vice president and general manager. It plans to expand the rollout to select grocery, natural and convenience stores over the next few weeks. The suggested retail price for the new drinks is $1.69 for a 16.9-ounce bottle, 50 cents more than for Gatorade Thirst Quencher, the nonorganic equivalent.


Kraft Heinz Co. released an organic version of Capri Sun juice last year and took artificial colors and flavors out of its macaroni and cheese. General Mills Inc. has removed artificial ingredients from some cereals. Campbell Soup Co. has pledged to make all of its North American products without artificial colors or flavors by the end of fiscal 2018.


To reach consumers seeking the organic label, Gatorade introduces G Organic. The USDA-certified organic sports drink is made from just seven ingredients, including: water, organic cane sugar, citric acid, organic natural flavor, sea salt, sodium citrate and potassium chloride. G Organic comes in strawberry, lemon and mixed berry varieties. The suggested retail price for each 16.9-ounce bottle is $1.69.


The product currently contains sucralose and artificial coloring, although it does include certain natural ingredients and flavors. Pepsi hasn't yet detailed what ingredients would be added or eliminated to make it organic.


America's most trusted neon-colored, creatively flavored (ahem, Glacier Freeze) sports drink just announced that it will be releasing an organic version in 2016. That's right, PepsiCo is taking Gatorade into the billion dollar organics industry. Why Because that's what the people want.


In an age where more and more consumers are looking for non-GMO, fewer preservatives and more natural foods, the company is looking outside of the soda industry for growth. Organic Gatorade is not the only move PepsiCo is making to satisfy this demand of the food industry. They're also launching a line of non-GMO-labeled Tropicana products in the new year.


Gatorade, though an extremely popular sports drink, doesn't exactly scream "all natural." PepsiCo is looking to change this perception, with the announcement of an organic version of the drink, which will debut in 2016, according to Business Insider.


Fortune writes, "The GMO-free labeled Tropicana, along with the organic Gatorade, are part of PepsiCo's broader efforts in recent years to bolster its 'healthier' products portfolio given the pressure on its sodas business," paralleling with PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi's sentiments that focusing solely on carbonated soft drinks is "a thing of the past."


This past Saturday, during a commercial break for college football, Gatorade ran a very curious advertisement. The ad contained a diagram of an organic molecule that, if it actually existed, would probably be dangerous. You certainly wouldn't be drinking it.


Problem #1. Whoever drew this molecule doesn't know the first thing about organic chemistry. This molecule cannot exist. The middle of the molecule features a benzene ring derivative. If hydrogen (H) is a part of the structure, it can only attach as a single bond. The H2 depicted in this molecule, however, attaches to the central benzene ring with a double bond. Impossible. (Similarly, the double bonded oxygen on top of the central ring is also impossible.) Also, hydrogen can only attach as a single atom (H), not as a diatomic molecule (H2). Furthermore, attachments to rings occur at the corners, not on the sides. 59ce067264






https://www.imahephysique.com/forum/self-help-forum/file-fallout-2-zip

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